Look who Muslims promote as Antichrist

52-part documentary, ‘The Arrivals,’ going viral on Internet

Guess who is being promoted as the “Antichrist” in a new 52-part video documentary making the rounds on YouTube?

The Islamic production company responsible makes the case that the endtimes global leader, also known as “the Beast of Revelation,” will actually be the Christian and Jewish Messiah.

Since being posted on YouTube in June, “The Arrivals” has gone viral with more than a quarter million views to date. According to sources in the United Kingdom, writes Joel Richardson, author of the new book, “The Islamic Antichrist,” in a WND commentary today, the documentary has become extremely popular among Britain’s Muslim youth population.

Understand the significance of the Muslim’s Mahdi ‘messiah’ in Joel Richardson’s new book, “The Islamic Antichrist: The Shocking Truth about the Real Nature of the Beast.”

According to the documentary’s self-description, he writes, its purpose is to, “Explore the Revelations in World Religions Regarding the Arrivals of the Antichrist Dajjal, Imam Al-Mahdi, and The Second Coming of The Christ.”

“The documentary is a whirlwind tour of Muslim apocalyptic narratives intermixed liberally with anti-American, anti-Christian, anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist themes,” according to Richardson. “Although clearly home-spun, ‘The Arrivals’ is a magnetic kitchen mix of every conspiracy imaginable with a solid thread of Islamic apocalyptic sermonizing throughout. Images are rhythmically flashed before the viewer of Illuminati and Freemasonry symbols along with the inevitable ‘Protocols of the Elders of Zion’ anti-Semitic conspiracy themes. And of course, it is all thoroughly topped off with graphic images of Muslim children suffering set to an Omen-like or Godfatheresque soundtrack. Short clips of movies are also liberally pirated throughout. From ‘The Lord of the Rings’ to ‘American Treasure,’ the viewer is immediately swept up into an ancient cosmic struggle with the heroic Muslim community fighting for truth against the plotting and scheming Zionists, Christians, Bilderbergers, Illuminati and the Club of Rome. The camera pans over the back of the American dollar bill with its prominent, all-seeing eye too many times to count.”

Richardson points out: “Muslim apocalyptic tradition holds that the Antichrist, whom they call ‘the Dajjal’ will be blind in one eye. Numerous Muslim authors and teachers have used this one-eyed motif to point the finger at a secret conspiracy of Freemasonry / Illuminati as the source of evil behind all world ills.”

The author, a student of Islam, says the notions put forward in the documentary are not fringe within the Islamic community.

“According to the documentary, Jesus Christ as He has been worshipped by Christians throughout history is merely a Christianized version of Ra, the Egyptian Sun god. Accordingly, the video makes the following claim about Jesus (aka Ra): “The ‘one-eyed’ sun god was referred to as ‘the son of god,’ ‘the light of the world’ and ‘the ruler of all.’ Has the Church deceived its followers into worshipping a one-eyed sun god? Has there been a worldwide conspiracy that is preparing the world to accept the one-eyed dajjal as the true messiah?”

In “The Islamic Antichrist,” Richardson exposes Western Christians to the Muslim traditions. He says most Christians have no idea of the stunning similarities between biblical Antichrist and the “Islamic Mahdi.”

“According to Islamic tradition, under the reign of the Mahdi, the Islamic religious community will be so blessed, so wealthy, that anyone who asks from the Mahdi for anything, it will be granted,” he writes.

Richardson’s book stands in stark contrast to most other popular prophecy books of the last 40 years.

The student of Islam and the Middle East says that after decades of reading popular prophecy books and even best-selling fiction like the “Left Behind” series, millions of evangelical Christians around the world are expecting the Antichrist to emerge from a revived Roman Empire, which many have assumed is associated with the Roman Catholic Church and the European Union.

Not so, argues Richardson. His book makes the case that the biblical Antichrist is one and the same as the Quran’s Muslim Mahdi.

“The Bible abounds with proofs that the Antichrist’s empire will consist only of nations that are, today, Islamic,” says Richardson. “Despite the numerous prevailing arguments for the emergence of a revived European Roman empire as the Antichrist’s power base, the specific nations the Bible identifies as comprising his empire are today all Muslim.”

Richardson believes the key error of many previous prophecy scholars involves the misinterpretation of a prediction by Daniel to Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar. Daniel describes the rise and fall of empires of the future, leading to the endtimes. Western Christians have viewed one of those empires as Rome, when, claims Richardson, Rome never actually conquered Babylon and was thus disqualified as a possibility.

It had to be another empire that rose and fell and rose again that would lead to rule of this “man of sin,” described in the Bible. That empire, he says, is the Islamic Empire, which did conquer Babylon and, in fact, rules over it even today.

Many evangelical Christians believe the Bible predicts a charismatic ruler, the Antichrist, will arise in the last days, before the return of Jesus. The Quran also predicts that a man, called the Mahdi, will rise up to lead the nations, pledging to usher in an era of peace. Richardson makes the case these two men are, in fact, one in the same.

Richardson is the co-author with Walid Shoebat of “God’s War on Terror: Islam, Prophecy and the Bible” and co-editor of “Why We Left Islam: Former Muslims Speak Out.” “The Islamic Antichrist” is published by WND Books.

Source: World Net Daily

August 31, 2009

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