From Physics To Metaphysics

by Roger Oakland

Evolution, according to its biological definition, is a mechanism that changes life through time. Although for years, many have used the idea of evolution to explain away God, there are many today who are saying, because of evolution, everything is God. This trend is obvious in Great Britain, the very country where Charles Darwin authored his theory – physics has turned into metaphysics? How is this possible?

Glastonbury is situated in the southern part of England. From antiquity, Glastonbury has been known as a mystical center where numerous people have made the claim they have encountered the spiritual realm. Many and fantastic are the legends, a mythology which is still alive and growing today. Every year people go there from all over the world seeking spiritual solutions to their physical problems.

I had the opportunity to visit Glastonbury in the spring of 1997 while I was in England. I had just spent a couple of days researching the life of Charles Darwin and investigating the impact this man had on so many lives. His message, centered on natural selection and survival of the fittest, still shapes the thinking of evolutionists today. His motive, a disdain for Christianity, provides the basis for the “scientific” view there is no need for the supernatural. Today, throughout England and around the world, numerous monuments erected in his honor called “natural history museums,” project his beliefs as if he were God.

My trip to Glastonbury and Stonehenge revealed another aspect of Darwinism that most “evolutionary biologists” are not thrilled to discuss. The idea of natural selection may have been designed to explain God away, but in reality, through time, it has been the catalyst which has created an environment which has done exactly the opposite. It seems there has been a major shift in thinking over the past few decades. Our present generation has become frustrated with believing in naturalism. Now they are willing to believe that anything and everything is God.

There is no question mysticism and superstition, which modern science was supposed to have eliminated, has made a comeback in Great Britain. The shops in Glastonbury were filled with spiritual paraphernalia which would make one think we had returned to the pagan past.

At the core of these resurrected ideas was the basic belief in evolution. Man, according to the “new spirituality,” is on the verge of taking a giant leap of evolution. “Space brothers” or “spiritual guides,” whom it is believed have evolved to a “higher lever,” are waiting for us to make the leap. Meanwhile, worldly intellects are encouraged to spend their time practicing yoga, humming mantras or rubbing crystals. There are many ways to contact the “gods.”

I am fascinated with how evolution has evolved over the years – from mysticism to Darwinism then back to mysticism again. History has repeated itself, just as it has done many times before. The only thing that is unique this time is that “evolutionary mysticism” is a global religion. The Bible describes this current trend as “Christian Babylonianism.” The Bible also makes it clear that it will trigger off God’s wrath. Based upon my understanding of current events, it appears the time of God’s wrath may be soon! (from Understand the Times with Roger Oakland)

Roger Oakland is the author of Faith Undone, a compelling and well documented critique of the emerging church and the new spirituality.

Please click here to read the full article

www.lighthousetrailsresearch.com/blog

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Ecumenical Jihad – John MacArthur

According to some prominent evangelical leaders, we’ve been fighting the wrong war. Protestants, Catholics, and other religious people should quit bickering over issues of heaven and hell and unite in the culture war.

Wait a minute…what’s wrong with this picture?

Sermon excerpt:

A woman once wrote to me, she said she thought Christianity was fine but frankly she was in to Zen. And she liked to listen to Christian radio, she says, because quote: “The music soothed…smoothed out her karma.” But she said I interrupted that karma because I am too narrow minded and too minded toward other religions. So she wrote to encourage me to be more broad minded. And she said, here’s a quote, “God doesn’t care what you believe as long as you believe. God doesn’t care what you believe, she says, as long as you’re sincere.” She went on to say, “All religions…all religions lead ultimately to the same reality, it doesn’t matter which road you take.” That’s pretty reflective of our generation, isn’t it? That’s a popular and pervasive lie that it doesn’t matter what you believe as long as you believe something and as long as you’re sincere because everybody’s going to get to the same end any way. That’s not what Matthew 7 records that Jesus said, He said, “The gate is wide and the way is broad,” that’s the religious road that most people are on, “and it leads to destruction.” And in Proverbs 14:12 it says, “There is a way which seems right to a man, but the ends thereof are the ways of death.”

Now I understand it’s political correct to have this kind of lattitude. I understand it’s political correct to not say your religion is right, and your faith is right and you believe right and everybody else is wrong. That doesn’t fly today, does it, in a post-modern world disinterested in truth? The great goal of post-modernism is that everybody is accepted no matter what it is that they believe and they certainly have a right to believe that. And who are you to come along and say you have the truth? We all know there is no such thing as real truth, it’s only a matter of preference, whatever makes you feel better is fine for you to believe. But don’t tell me it’s the truth and everything other than that is error. That’s not popular.

Now that kind of indiscriminate view of truth, or a view of non-truth is so pervasive that it is literally infecting evangelicalism and people are now saying that there are folks, as I said earlier, and all over the world and tucked off into little corners who never will know the truth and God will take them to heaven any way. And there is a book, I referred to this when I was teaching in Italy a couple of weeks ago called Ecumenical Jihad. Jihad is a holy war and the writer of the book, Peter Kreeft is a Catholic apologist, is saying that if we’re going to win the holy war which is the war for the culture, if we’re ever going to get the world to be more moral and get the world to be behaving itself better and end the wars and the crime and all the rest and get a moral world, we’ve got to fight that holy war together so we have to get ecumenical, so we all have to get together. We can’t do it alone.

So he says in the book, we have to recognize that we’re really all God’s children, we’re all going to…down the same road to the same heaven. And he writes the book in a very clever way. It opens up with him surfing in California, I guess, and he gets turned over by a wave and he hits bottom and has an out-of-body experience. He goes to heaven. And when he goes to heaven he’s amazed to find out when he arrives in heaven he sees Buddha, in whom anybody would recognize, I suppose, he’s a rather unique looking character. No doubt he didn’t have too long to discover who this was and he meets Buddha and he says, “What in the world are you doing in heaven?” I mean, Buddhism is not Christianity. What are you doing? He says, “Well, you know, I was in to contemplation, I was into peace and I was into tranquility and what I didn’t know about Jesus God sorted out when I arrived.”

And then he went a little further and he ran into Mohammed and he said, “What are you doing here? You just believe Jesus is another one of the prophets like Mohammed. What are you doing here, how did you get here?” And he said, “Well, we were into morality.” In fact, Kreeft says in his book that Muslims are better Christians than Christians because they don’t fornicate, adulterate, commit homosexuality and other things…it’s against their standards so they tend to do it less than people who claim to be Christians do and so they’re actually better Christians than Christians. And Mohammed says…What I didn’t know about Jesus, God straightened out when I arrived.

And he goes a little further and he comes across some Jews who didn’t believe in Jesus either but they were worshiping the true God, the God of the Old Testament and that was good enough for God because they were worshiping Him, the true God. And what they didn’t know about Jesus they found out when they arrived in heaven.

And then he ran into a group of atheists. And the atheists were searching for truth, and since God is truth they were really searching for God and that was good enough for God. So they were there, too.

And Peter Kreeft’s point is that look, when we get to heaven we’re going to find each other there anyway, why are we fighting down here? Let’s all get together and win this war.

Well, toward the end of the book, I’m going through it rather rapidly, he says, “Now we need a general, we need a great leader to lead us if we’re going to fight this war…getting all the Muslims, and all the Buddhists, and all the Jews, and all the atheists, and everybody else together. And there were others as well. And we’re going to all get together, we have to have a leader.” He says, “There’s one great leader, the great winner of unwinnable wars.” He calls him, “The Pope, and he’ll be our leader and we have to have an internal power and so we all have to devout ourselves to Mary. Mary is the great spiritual power, the great spiritual source. So we’ll all get together, we’ll all worship Mary, we’ll have the Pope as our leader. We’ll all embrace and we’ll win the jihad.”

And you say, “Well, that’s pretty bizarre stuff?” Well what is even more amazing is on the back is an endorsement and the endorsement is by Chuck Colson and this is what it says, on the back of the book. “Peter Kreeft,” the writer, “is one of the premier apologists in America today, one of our most valiant, intellectual warriors,” end quote.

Peter Kreeft is a deceiver and a liar. He’s not one of our most or premier apologist. And even more shocking was a quote from J.I. Packer who talks about the book and then asks at the end of his little blurb, “What if he is right?”

Are we asking that question? Is he right? Is everybody going to heaven no matter what they believe?

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To Judge or Not Be Judged

By Ray Yungen

With regard to the current spiritual deception coming into the church, let us ask two questions:

  • Is it right to judge? And do all paths lead to God?

Jesus Christ foretold in Matthew 7:22-23

Many will say to me in that day, “Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?” And then will I profess unto them, “I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.”

I find it most interesting that people who were doing “many wonderful works” or miraculous works in His name were, in reality, working “iniquity” or evil. This leads me to believe that a great deception is occurring.

These verses also tell me that all paths do not lead to God and, because they do not, one had better judge which path is correct. Many people, of course, counter with, “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” However, taken in context, this verse (Matthew 7:1) is talking about hypocrisy in human behavior and not about withholding critical examination of spiritual teachings. Galatians 1:8 bears out the necessity to evaluate spiritual teaching with proper discernment. Paul warns:

But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed.

And II John 1:9-11 says:

Whosoever transgresseth, and abideth not in the doctrine of Christ, hath not God. He that abideth in the doctrine of Christ, he hath both the Father and the Son. If there come any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, receive him not into your house, neither bid him God speed: For he that biddeth him God speed is partaker of his evil deeds.

And again in Ephesians 5:11, “…have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.”

How may we reprove something if we don’t determine whether or not it fits the bill of “unfruitful works?” In II Timothy 3:16-17, we read:

All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect [complete], thoroughly furnished [fully equipped] unto all good works.

For more on this area: “For Many Shall Come in My Name” by Ray Yungen.

Article received and posted courtesy of Lighthouse Trails Research.

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Goodbye Emergent Church

Goodbye Emergent: Why I’m Taking The Theology of the Emerging Church To Task

writes Jeremy Bouma …

I’m not exactly sure when my saucy love affair with emergent and liberal Christianity ended. My “I don’t” isn’t as crystalized as my “I do.” Maybe it was when I read Pelagius‘ writings and realized much of Emergent theology really does mirror his 5th century theology.

Maybe it was after the former head of Emergent Village, Tony Jones, rejected original sin, a historic part of the Rule of Faith, claiming that it is “neither biblically, philosophically, nor scientifically tenable.

Maybe it was when I read Fredrick Schleiermacher and realized his and modern liberalism’s vapid, gospel-less faith are being repackaged and popularized to an unsuspecting, ignorant Christian community as a wholesome alternative to what has been.

Maybe it was after I read Karl Barth and realized the natural theology pushed by popular emergent theologians is not revitalizing Christian faith, but killing it; it is the same kind of faith Barth so vociferously fought against in order to preserve the historic Rule of Faith.

Maybe it was after reading a leading emerging church voice suggest that God and grace and the Kingdom of God are not tied directly and exclusively to Jesus Christ; ultimately its not really about Jesus, but about a vanilla, generalized World-Spirit god (lower-case “g”)

Source

on Monday, February 8, 2010

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